Slimed in Action

on March 9, 2010 in Misc

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I feel like crap.

I mean, we’re talking serious crap.   Fuzzy brain, sore throat, glands swollen like diseased gills, red blurry eyes set in a mean squint, inability to stay lucid for half an hour at a time.  I went to work this morning because there were a few tasks I had to get done.  But after growling at my colleagues and whining to my boss, I figured it was time to go home.   They were all glad to see me go.   I am really, really not a nice person to be around when I’m sick.

Tomorrow, unfortunately, I gotta go into work no matter how I feel ’cause there’s a proposal to get out.   With any luck I won’t get my cooties and bad vibes all over the project and hence doom it to failure.   And to help stave off such misfortune, I’m going back to my bed as soon as I finish typing this thing (I spent the afternoon there, curled up in a fetal position).

In the next couple nights I should be healthy and dangerously action-packed again, and that’s when I’ll let you know about my upcoming plans.    On the agenda: akido and a self-defense course, among other things harmful to my body.

Oh boy!   More injuries!   More bruises!   More trips to my chiropractor!

I really should know better by now and just stay in bed.

Ghostbusters_9066 red eyes

5 Responses to “Slimed in Action”

  1. Robert L. Read says:

    I don’t know how well it works in a novel, but sometimes being a hero means doing ordinary things under extraordinary circumstances. I can imagine climbing a wall while blinded would be an example, or fighting with a wounded knee (something near and dear to my heart), or walking half a mile in ten minutes while carrying an unconscious child, or going to work when you are sick.

  2. admin says:

    Very true, and in fact such real heroism works well in novels, especially the serious, literary kind. I guess I’ve been concentrating so much on over-the-top, action hero movie/fun novel stuff in this blog that it’s easy to lose sight of real, everyday heroism.
    But — aack! — my going to work while sick certainly doesn’t qualify as heroism. On the other hand, people working while seriously ill to make sure their kids get fed, that does qualify.
    So did you fight with a wounded knee? I’d love to know!

  3. Robert L. Read says:

    No, I have never fought with a wounded knee, and have not really fought at all short of breaking up fights between teens and drunks. I shouldn’t have made it sound like I had. However, I have a hurt knee right now, and for some reason some of my nightmares involve being attached by a group of wolves or men while my mobility is limited.

  4. Ann says:

    Speaking of heroes with disabilities and grit, I was soaking in the hot tub at my gym after working out and watched a 45 year old (just a guess on his age) climbing out of the lap pool. He pulled himself out of the water with the help of a cane and fell twice before reaching the bench to rest. He had an incredible “swimmer’s” build and obviously worked out regularly in the pool and probably did some weight lifting also. Another man offered to assist him several times but he refused and his determination was quite inspiring. I think he may have MS or perhaps he suffered from a stroke.
    I guess we have choices. We can give in to our frailties and fear or we can conquer them. His very effort was heroic.

  5. admin says:

    People like that are awe-inspiring. Like Robert said so well in his post, a hero can mean doing ordinary things under extraordinary circumstances.